Linux on the Desktop (continued)

In an earlier post, I talk about 2004 as a year where Linux begins to make inroads on the desktop. Here is a recent article from Infoworld suggesting the same. In the article Nat Friedman, cofounder of Ximian which was recently sold to Novell, makes some interesting points.

1. It is not a David vs. Goliath battle where Linux fells Microsoft with one swift blow;
2. Desktops for Linux shouldn’t try to look like Windows.

To dive deeper into point #2, Friedman says, “What you’re doing is lying to the user. What you want to say from the outset is, ‘this is a different desktop experience, but it’s going to be easy.” On the one hand he seems to be saying this because the user experience on Linux should be better, more reliable, and more secure. On the other hand, I disagree because from a business perspective corporations usually pursue the path of least resistance. If a Linux desktop acts and feels like Windows it means that corporations will not have to train their employees on a new OS. This saves a company potentially lots of hours and $$$ and lowers the Total Cost of Ownership of the product.

Time for Linux on the Desktop?

As everyone knows, Linux has grown dramatically in the server market capturing 20+% market share in a few years. Many of you also know that there have been a number of attempts to bring Linux to the desktop. Eazel founded in 2000 wanted to make a Linux GUI as easy to use as a Mac. While many of these attempts failed, I believe we are ready for another wave to bring Linux back to the desktop for the following reasons:

1. Success of Linux in server market causing enterprises to evaluate Linux on desktop;
2. Pricing-Microsoft changed its pricing model forcing enterprises to upgrade every 2 years;
3. Security-tired of those MSFT patch updates yet;
4. Functionality-it has gotten way better and easier to use and install, even office apps work on Linux;
5. Performance-do not have to upgrade hardware with software;
6. Browser becoming a platform in and of itself-more and more applications are being run in the browser as we get more and more connected to the Internet.

There are a number of companies going after this market including: Suse, Lindows, redhat, and Xandros.

As time passes, Linux is increasingly becoming a viable alterntive to Windows. That being said, it will not be for everyone like power Office users. However, I feel that in 2004 we will see some large corporations go with Linux on the desktop. Many corporations are already looking at how to segment its users and figure out who really needs Windows and Office and who can get by without it. Microsoft is already countering by saying the Total Cost of Ownership is much higher with Linux. What’s needed are management tools so that a system administrator can easily manage a multi-OS environment. If Linux on the desktop is going to be successful in the corporate market it will have to coexist with Windows. Of course, that is a different story on the international front where many countries are moving to Linux outright. Either way, it will be interesting to track this development over the next couple of years.